Shock and Vibration Testing – Ensure Product Performance

From sub-atomic particles entirely as much as skyscrapers, internal movements and motions caused by the absorption of energy make all objects vibrate with a degree climatic simulation testing. This fact ensures that in some sort of full of energy and movement, vibrations — or the oscillating responses of objects when moved from a situation of rest — would be the norm.

Some vibrations are expected and even needed for products to function as expected. As a great example, consider traditional speakers that turn energy into vibrations, which ultimately allows music lovers to hear their favorite singers and musicians. Another example could be the tightly stretched diaphragm within the chest piece of a stethoscope, which, when excited by sound waves, allows a physician to hear a patient’s heartbeat and/or breathing.

Obviously, not all objects vibrate in a way that’s helpful or even intended. For instance, there probably isn’t a civil engineer alive who doesn’t know the story of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and how 40-mile-per-hour winds induced its collapse because of structural vibration climatic test enclosures. When it comes to rest people, we realize of the bridge’s final, fateful moments on November 7, 1940 as a result of the frequently viewed footage captured by camera store owner Barney Elliott. The film shows the bridge starting violent wavelike motion before breaking up and falling into Washington State’s Puget Sound below.

A more recent exemplory instance of unintended vibration could be the now famous June 10, 2000 opening day of London’s Millennium Footbridge. The combined synchronous movements of pedestrians caused what’s known as positive feedback — a swaying motion emanating from the natural human instinct to keep balanced while walking. The result resulted in Londoners dubbing the structure the “Wobbly Bridge.”

Fortunately for manufacturers and consumers alike, the materials and products we rely on today in sets from airplane wings to suspension bridges are created stronger and more reliable thanks in large part to vibration testing.

From sub-atomic particles entirely as much as skyscrapers, internal movements and motions caused by the absorption of energy make all objects vibrate with a degree. This fact ensures that in some sort of full of energy and movement, vibrations — or the oscillating responses of objects when moved from a situation of rest — would be the norm.

Some vibrations are expected and even needed for products to function as expected. As a great example, consider traditional speakers that turn energy into vibrations, which ultimately allows music lovers to hear their favorite singers and musicians. Another example could be the tightly stretched diaphragm within the chest piece of a stethoscope, which, when excited by sound waves, allows a physician to hear a patient’s heartbeat and/or breathing.

Obviously, not all objects vibrate in a way that’s helpful or even intended. For instance, there probably isn’t a civil engineer alive who doesn’t know the story of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and how 40-mile-per-hour winds induced its collapse because of structural vibration. When it comes to rest people, we realize of the bridge’s final, fateful moments on November 7, 1940 as a result of the frequently viewed footage captured by camera store owner climatic testing. The film shows the bridge starting violent wavelike motion before breaking up and falling into Washington State’s Puget Sound below.

A more recent exemplory instance of unintended vibration could be the now famous June 10, 2000 opening day of London’s Millennium Footbridge. The combined synchronous movements of pedestrians caused what’s known as positive feedback — a swaying motion emanating from the natural human instinct to keep balanced while walking. The result resulted in Londoners dubbing the structure the “Wobbly Bridge.”

Fortunately for manufacturers and consumers alike, the materials and products we rely on today in sets from airplane wings to suspension bridges are created stronger and more reliable thanks in large part to vibration testing.

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